Fort Worth: The Best Travel Excuse When Visiting Northern Texas

Fort Worth with its wide variety of interesting restaurants, Cultural District and Rodeo roots is easily one place you’ll want to visit when in the Northern Texas area.

Fort Worth has a wonderful flair and too many fun activities and cultural sites to mention in one article.

The city is most appreciative of its fine art as well as its cowboy/rodeo exterior. It is this diverse blend that makes the city a most worthwhile visit.

It is very hot during the summer months and fairly mild during winter. Spring and fall are wonderful times of the year: as long as the city does not experience periodic tornadoes.

The Main Street Arts Festival is held in the month of April and the Women’s National Finals Rodeo is the event to attend in the month of November.

The city center in Forth Worth is an active variety of bars, restaurants and shops. The area has been totally revitalized.

The vibrancy of Ft. Worth cannot be over-stated. There are two unique sites you need to go and “feast” your eyes upon when visiting the downtown area: One site is the Tarrant County Courthouse (circa 1895) and found on Ft. Worth’s main street. The other site is the Mural of Chisholm Trail by the artist Richard Haas.

If you would like to participate in Ft. Worth’s cowboy custom, you will naturally want to check out the selection of fine cowboy hats offered by Peters Brothers (located on Main Street).

On a hot Fort Worth summer day, it only makes good sense to visit the delightfully cool spray of the Water Gardens with its waterfalls and pools all designed by Philip Johnson.

The cultural district that overlooks the downtown area on a slight incline has a vast amount of museums.

A pretty light pink brick building houses the National Cowgirl Museum and Hall of Fame. The building is the design of David Schwarz. Here there is a variety of fun activities, some of which include reviewing giant size scrapbooks documenting life on the ranch and filming you being the rider in a 1930’s old-fashioned rodeo.

The Amon Carter Museum is not to be missed. The museum showcases an enormous collection of Remingtons, Russells as well as other fine American paintings and photographs by the modernist and architect (winner of the Pritzker Prize) Tadao Ando. The museum’s collection is housed in a massive 50,000 square foot building so wear some good walking shoes.

The older and iconic Kimbell is well worth the trip displaying European and non-Western paintings. If you happen to be visiting the Kimbell at lunch, a café on the grounds serves up salads as well as quiches.

The historic Stockyards was once the main hub for cattle drives on the Chisholm Trail and at a later date a place where cattle were shipped by rail by the stockmen.

The stockyards nowadays has changed its use. Here you can board a steam train named the Tarantula and go on an excursion to the nearby historic town of Grapevine.

Additionally, a mini-mall and train depot called Stockyards Stations provides visitors with stucco buildings and brick streets.

Do you want to know where some of the locals eat in Fort Worth? Well, take note as one very popular steak house is the stylish Del Frisco’s.

Head over to Lonesome Dove Western Bistro for the grilled (Quail) quesadillas.

Or if you prefer a lighter meal, delight in a plate of calamari while dining on the patio at Angelina. The restaurant faces the massive statues of trumpeting angels located at the Bass Performance Hall.

Café Ashton, located downtown, offers dishes like roasted lobster bisque and delicious wild mushroom risotto.

Joe T. Garcia’s has been around since the 1930s starting out as an eight table diner located in a little wooden shack. Today, Joe T. Garcia’s covers an entire block. Here there are outdoor patios, enchiladas or fajitas and margaritas.

If you are searching for a good “combo” platter of appetizers try the tequila shrimp and tenderloin tamales (appetizer) platter at Pedro’s Trailer Park, a truly fun and “funky:” place.

If you’d like garb fit for a Rodeo, you’ll want to head on over to Maverick Fine Western Wear. Here you will find a nice assortment of beaded and embroidered shirts as well as colorful chartreuse cowboy boots.

A wealth of art galleries is clustered around the Cultural District. Visit Carol Henderson’s where you will find ornamental crosses and unique, one-of-a-kind jewelry items.

The Santa Fe Warehouse was constructed in 1937 and is nowadays the Fort Worth Rail Market. You will find merchants selling fresh produce, seafood, wine and beautiful cut flowers. There is also a tamale shop and an all-vegan restaurant (the first of its kind in Fort Worth.)

Wherever you go in the city, there is something unique and interesting to enjoy. Fort Worth with its art, unique choice of restaurants and shops and cowboy history is well worth a visit.